Network Identification not working?

device-detection
#1

All,

I’ve got Network Identification enabled on the sense. With any other network scanning utility I will find the 30 or so connected network devices within a couple minutes. Sense on the other hand doesn’t seem to see anything. Is it going to see and query device manufacturer and do basic identification? If not what is the purpose of this feature?

Thank you!

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#2

It doesn’t work that way. There are older posts on here that address your concern. Do a search and you’ll likely find what you’re looking for.

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#3

Not the purpose of NDI. NDI looks for “turn on” and “turn off” packets from certain smartTVs, printers, etc. on a single subnet.

#4

Thanks for the question @bryan,

@senseinaz and @kevin1 are right, Network Device Identification or (NDI) is looking for any on/off clues from devices on the same network as Sense. Some devices on the network are really good about providing clear and consistent pings (Samsung TVs are remarkably polite…) while others can create quite a bit of noise that we’re working our way through over time. Those pings are used to inform the traditional model building and load calculations, as none of these network pings broadcast any information about how much power said device is using, so your monitor still needs to build a model for measurement which takes some time. With that being said, we won’t be able to immediately identify all the devices on your network, but with NDI enabled, you’re helping contribute to this research so we can figure out better ways to parse the network data and get better device identification to the entire community!

I hope that’s helpful. There’s a bit more information in this blog post if that’s useful:
https://blog.sense.com/articles/network-device-identification/

#5

Thanks all, I appreciate the clarification!

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#6

@BradAtSense,
I think you used the term “pinging” figuratively rather than literally ? Unless things have changed since the blog was written:

Sense is not able to inspect any content since it only listens for broadcast messages (sent via SSDP/UPnP, Zeroconf, and ARP). No other traffic on your network is captured or inspected.

#7

Yes, thanks for clarifying @kevin1. The broadcast messages were what I meant when I used the term “ping(s)”, which makes me think about the Monty Python sketch about the machine that goes ping:

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